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The Parallel of Adam and Christ
Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 8:00 AM

The Mind the Heart and the Way of Salvation The Expulsion of Adam and Eve copy 1 The Parallel of Adam and Christ

Greek Icon


by Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon

“As the whole human being fell in Adam, the whole human being was restored in Christ. ” – Orthodoxy Today October 2009



It’s the Wreckers’ Economy, Stupid!
Tuesday, December 12, 2017, 3:08 PM

Seriously, societies change very slowly when people’s livelihoods may be affected. The silversmiths in ancient Ephesus whipped up a mob protesting Paul’s evangelical threat to the popularity of their goddess Diana since the smiths made a killing selling silver images of the little darling.

What’s worse is reluctance to allow solutions to social ills to languish, blocked by those who profit directly or indirectly from the negative outcomes. They care more about their livelihoods or simply the status quo than the good of the neighbor or of “humanity” in general.

It would be like the American Body Shop Association opposing traffic lights at dangerous intersections.

Screen Shot 2017 12 12 at 3.08.59 PM 300x204 Its the Wreckers Economy, Stupid!But our wrecker economy is not as direct as the one I wrote about in this Salvo column, the wreckers of 19th-century England who opposed lighthouses because they thrived on salvaging goods from shipwrecks. Our wreckers’ economy is so large it’s hard to see it. We just take it for granted. There are undoubtedly people who are doing a service while benefitting from the general wreck of society. The latter might be like a young sympathetic English entrepreneur raised by wreckers who decides to produce and sell life-jackets and life-boats and warm blankets to aid sailors fleeing wrecks, all the while the wreckers continue to oppose building lighthouses that would stop the wreckage in the first place.

Our chief Wreck of the Century (20th, that is) is the family, sunk by the submerged rocks of the sexual revolution. No doubt employment opportunities among certain professions have risen dramatically since sex was turned on its head, transformed from a protected congress of the sexes within a licit marital union to something, anything, “sexual” you can do (or get away with doing) short of coercing someone else to do it with you.

The list of rising employment opportunities during the Sexual Boom and the trailing Family Breakdown is impressive:

Pornographers. Abortionists. STD researchers. Sex Education teachers and curriculum publishers. Lobbyists for sexual offenses legal reform. Sexual dysfunction products and counselors and treatment centers. No fault divorce lawyers. Child custody lawyers. Child advocates. Post-abortion counselors. Sexual harassment policy writers and counselors. Police, criminal lawyers, prison guards and architects (yes, most men in prison were not raised in intact families). Child pornography.

True, among the above are some services that must be offered in compassion once the damage has been done, so I do not fault those who wish to serve hurting people. They are needed. But what about stopping the sources of hurt farther upstream? Are there credible efforts to suppress the rate of divorce? Shore up marital commitment? Suppress teen promiscuity, sexual trafficking, hooking up?

Or is society satisfied that a eager read of Fifty Shades of Grey is the innocent new normal, while being shocked at all the sexual abuse going on? We’ve approved of lighting the fire of sex outside the safety of the family hearth and are surprised that the countryside is aflame and houses are burning to the ground.

No doubt many people hired some of the above professionals because they did not “want to ruin my life.” And the choices were hard. Nevertheless, the cumulative effect of so many choices is the ruination of a generation and more. When everyone says me first–which can be our fallen inclination when given choices other may have never dreamed of–no one is first, least of all the most vulnerable and needy among us: the children. We should be ashamed, but few seem to even know what the word even means anymore, let alone feel it. It’s time to build lighthouses.



Music for the Second Sunday of Advent
Sunday, December 10, 2017, 8:00 AM


Bach – Cantata BWV 70

Readings:
Epistle: Romans 15: 4-13 The call of the Gentiles
Gospel: Luke 21: 25-36 Watch and pray always



A Walk Through the Old Testament- Part Four
Saturday, December 9, 2017, 12:00 PM


A panoramic view of the Old Testament and it importance to ancient Christianity. Final episode.

University of Nottingham professor Margaret Barker, past President of the Society for Old Testament Studies, has developed an approach to Biblical Studies now known as Temple Theology, which uses a wide variety of sources to trace the roots of Christian theology back to the first Temple and to illustrate how the world view, traditions, customs and symbolism of the Temple were formative influences on the development of Christianity.



Know Your Enemy
Thursday, December 7, 2017, 2:03 PM

A very edifying and concise 25-minute presentation by Ryan M. Reeves (PhD Cambridge), Assistant Professor of Historical Theology at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. Indirectly shows how much of what Christians encounter today from the secular religion of Leftism is, at its core, the result of classic Gnostic delusions:

Gnosticism and the Early Church



Christ as the ”New Adam“ and ”Head“
Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 8:00 AM
Georges de La Tour The New born. Christ as the ”New Adam“ and ”Head“

The New-born Christ by Georges de la Tour

by Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon

What humanity lost in Adam, it regained — transformed — in Christ. When God’s Son became man, “He commenced afresh the long line of human beings, and furnished us with salvation in a succinct, inclusive manner, so that what we had lost in Adam — namely, to be according to the image and likeness of God — that we might recover in Christ Jesus” (3.18.1).Orthodoxy Today



The Origins of Advent
Sunday, December 3, 2017, 8:00 AM
annunciation of the blessed virgin mary 01 The Origins of Advent

Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Fra Angelico

by Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon

In the Roman Catholic Church and other Christian churches of the West, the several weeks prior to Christmas are known as Advent, a name from a Latin word meaning “coming.” It happens that the beginning of Advent always falls on the Sunday closest to November 30, the ancient feast day (in both East and West) of the Apostle Andrew. Among Christians in the West, this preparatory season, which tends to be slightly less rigorous than Lent and often involves no special fasting at all, always begins on the fourth Sunday before Christmas. Thus, from year to year it will vary in length between 3 and 4 weeks, but always with four Sundays. Read the rest at Orthodoxy Today.



Music for the First Sunday of Advent
Sunday, December 3, 2017, 8:00 AM


Bach – Cantata BWV 61


Bach – Cantata BWV 36


Telemann – “Jesu, komm in meine Seele”

Readings:
Epistle: Romans 13: 11-14 Our salvation is nearer than we believe
Gospel: Matthew 21: 1-9 Christ’s entry into Jerusalem



A Walk through the Old Testament – Part Three
Saturday, December 2, 2017, 12:00 PM

A panoramic view of the Old Testament and it importance to ancient Christianity.

University of Nottingham professor Margaret Barker, past President of the Society for Old Testament Studies, has developed an approach to Biblical Studies now known as Temple Theology, which uses a wide variety of sources to trace the roots of Christian theology back to the first Temple and to illustrate how the world view, traditions, customs and symbolism of the Temple were formative influences on the development of Christianity.



“… grow in holiness and purity …”
Sunday, November 26, 2017, 10:55 AM

An edifying thought for those of us who are sometimes discouraged with our church leaders. Our task as Christians: to ignore the passing storms and seek to grow in holiness and purity.

For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ (Ephesians 4:12).

This is why the Holy Spirit apportioned the gifts, and made some apostles, others prophets, others evangelists, and others pastors and teachers: that the saints, the faithful Christians, become perfected. As in a household, honor and service are apportioned, and there is honor and service appropriate to parents, honor and service appropriate to adult sons and daughters, and honor and service appropriate to young children and servants-yet all serve together for the benefit of one another; so it is in God’s house, the Holy Church: with every honor is a corresponding service, and the services of each are beneficial to all. Thus the body of Christ, God’s Holy Church, is gradually and wisely built. Each of the faithful, assisted by the others, grows and develops as a member of this body; grows and develops in holiness and purity, and in a corresponding measure and proportion to the whole great body.

~ Bishop Nikolai Velimirovich, Prologue of Ochrid (on the purpose of the apportionment of gifts, ministries and callings)


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