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Music for the Second Sunday of Advent
Sunday, December 10, 2017, 8:00 AM


Bach – Cantata BWV 70

Readings:
Epistle: Romans 15: 4-13 The call of the Gentiles
Gospel: Luke 21: 25-36 Watch and pray always



A Walk Through the Old Testament- Part Four
Saturday, December 9, 2017, 12:00 PM


A panoramic view of the Old Testament and it importance to ancient Christianity. Final episode.

University of Nottingham professor Margaret Barker, past President of the Society for Old Testament Studies, has developed an approach to Biblical Studies now known as Temple Theology, which uses a wide variety of sources to trace the roots of Christian theology back to the first Temple and to illustrate how the world view, traditions, customs and symbolism of the Temple were formative influences on the development of Christianity.



Know Your Enemy
Thursday, December 7, 2017, 2:03 PM

A very edifying and concise 25-minute presentation by Ryan M. Reeves (PhD Cambridge), Assistant Professor of Historical Theology at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. Indirectly shows how much of what Christians encounter today from the secular religion of Leftism is, at its core, the result of classic Gnostic delusions:

Gnosticism and the Early Church



Christ as the ”New Adam“ and ”Head“
Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 8:00 AM
Georges de La Tour The New born. Christ as the ”New Adam“ and ”Head“

The New-born Christ by Georges de la Tour

by Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon

What humanity lost in Adam, it regained — transformed — in Christ. When God’s Son became man, “He commenced afresh the long line of human beings, and furnished us with salvation in a succinct, inclusive manner, so that what we had lost in Adam — namely, to be according to the image and likeness of God — that we might recover in Christ Jesus” (3.18.1).Orthodoxy Today



The Origins of Advent
Sunday, December 3, 2017, 8:00 AM
annunciation of the blessed virgin mary 01 The Origins of Advent

Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Fra Angelico

by Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon

In the Roman Catholic Church and other Christian churches of the West, the several weeks prior to Christmas are known as Advent, a name from a Latin word meaning “coming.” It happens that the beginning of Advent always falls on the Sunday closest to November 30, the ancient feast day (in both East and West) of the Apostle Andrew. Among Christians in the West, this preparatory season, which tends to be slightly less rigorous than Lent and often involves no special fasting at all, always begins on the fourth Sunday before Christmas. Thus, from year to year it will vary in length between 3 and 4 weeks, but always with four Sundays. Read the rest at Orthodoxy Today.



Music for the First Sunday of Advent
Sunday, December 3, 2017, 8:00 AM


Bach – Cantata BWV 61


Bach – Cantata BWV 36


Telemann – “Jesu, komm in meine Seele”

Readings:
Epistle: Romans 13: 11-14 Our salvation is nearer than we believe
Gospel: Matthew 21: 1-9 Christ’s entry into Jerusalem



A Walk through the Old Testament – Part Three
Saturday, December 2, 2017, 12:00 PM

A panoramic view of the Old Testament and it importance to ancient Christianity.

University of Nottingham professor Margaret Barker, past President of the Society for Old Testament Studies, has developed an approach to Biblical Studies now known as Temple Theology, which uses a wide variety of sources to trace the roots of Christian theology back to the first Temple and to illustrate how the world view, traditions, customs and symbolism of the Temple were formative influences on the development of Christianity.



“… grow in holiness and purity …”
Sunday, November 26, 2017, 10:55 AM

An edifying thought for those of us who are sometimes discouraged with our church leaders. Our task as Christians: to ignore the passing storms and seek to grow in holiness and purity.

For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ (Ephesians 4:12).

This is why the Holy Spirit apportioned the gifts, and made some apostles, others prophets, others evangelists, and others pastors and teachers: that the saints, the faithful Christians, become perfected. As in a household, honor and service are apportioned, and there is honor and service appropriate to parents, honor and service appropriate to adult sons and daughters, and honor and service appropriate to young children and servants-yet all serve together for the benefit of one another; so it is in God’s house, the Holy Church: with every honor is a corresponding service, and the services of each are beneficial to all. Thus the body of Christ, God’s Holy Church, is gradually and wisely built. Each of the faithful, assisted by the others, grows and develops as a member of this body; grows and develops in holiness and purity, and in a corresponding measure and proportion to the whole great body.

~ Bishop Nikolai Velimirovich, Prologue of Ochrid (on the purpose of the apportionment of gifts, ministries and callings)



A Walk Through the Old Testament – Part Two
Saturday, November 25, 2017, 12:00 PM

A panoramic view of the Old Testament and it importance to ancient Christianity.

University of Nottingham professor Margaret Barker, past President of the Society for Old Testament Studies, has developed an approach to Biblical Studies now known as Temple Theology, which uses a wide variety of sources to trace the roots of Christian theology back to the first Temple and to illustrate how the world view, traditions, customs and symbolism of the Temple were formative influences on the development of Christianity.



A Walk Through the Old Testament – Part One
Sunday, November 19, 2017, 12:00 PM

A panoramic view of the Old Testament and it importance to ancient Christianity.

University of Nottingham professor Margaret Barker, past President of the Society for Old Testament Study, has developed an approach to Biblical Studies now known as Temple Theology, which uses a wide variety of sources to trace the roots of Christian theology back to the first Temple and to illustrate how the world view, traditions, customs and symbolism of the Temple were formative influences on the development of Christianity.

Margaret Barker Page at Amazon


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