Mere Links 01.23.15
Friday, January 23, 2015, 10:00 AM

Sex Education in America: How Yesterday’s Extremists Shaped Today’s Sex Ed
Valerie Huber, Public Discourse

In order to influence the future of sex education, we must have a nuanced understanding of its colorful past.

DR Congo unrest: Catholic church backs protests
BBC

The Catholic Church in the Democratic Republic of Congo has thrown its weight behind protests against President Joseph Kabila extending his rule.

The Latest Debate Over Catholic Social Thought
Gerald J. Russello, Crisis Magazine

Pope Francis’ statements about economics (and related questions, such as environmentalism and “fracking”) have caused much consternation among conservative Catholics in the United States. The Holy Father’s comments on the “greed” of capitalism and his seeming belief that capitalism causes income inequality rather than providing explosive growth and increased prosperity historically seem without nuance at best, and ignorant at worst.

To Some in California, Founder of Church Missions Is Far From Saint
Carol Pogash , New York Times

For generations, fourth graders in California’s schools, often with a parent’s touch, built models of church missions out of poster board or sugar cubes to celebrate the Rev. Junipero Serra and the religious communities he established along the West Coast in the late 1700s.



Mere Links 01.22.15
Thursday, January 22, 2015, 10:00 AM

Pentecost: The Whole Paschal Season
Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon, Preachers Institute

In Luke’s theology the mission of the Holy Spirit is especially related to the event of Pentecost. Consequently, the forgiveness and remission of sins—the Holy Spirit’s first gift—forms a theme foundational to the imagery of Pentecost. This is the case, whether “Pentecost” refers to the whole Paschal season (its older meaning) or refers to the specific day of the Holy Spirit’s descent.

Has Roe Already Been Overturned? The Viability Of The Pain-Capable Act
Charles C. Camosy, The Federalist

The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act would ban abortions after 20 weeks gestation (except for rape or to save the mother’s life). And it’s probably consonant with Roe v. Wade.

What’s the Problem with IVF?
Matthew Hosier, Think Theology

One of the ethical questions I am most often asked is whether IVF is an appropriate course of action for Christian couples.

The Scale Of The Universe And The Religious View
Hugh Hunter, First Things

Who is the protagonist of Hamlet? It seems pretty obvious that it is the dark prince himself, but I am sure you can imagine a clever reader making a case that it is really Ophelia, or Claudius, or some other important character. What would you say to someone who said that the protagonist was actually Cornelius, the Danish envoy to Norway, whose one line is shared with someone else?



Mere Links 01.21.15
Wednesday, January 21, 2015, 10:00 AM

How Southern Baptists became pro-life
David Roach, Baptist Press

In 1979, Larry Lewis picked up a copy of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and saw a full-page ad listing the Southern Baptist Convention among denominations that affirmed the right to abortion. “Right there beside the Unitarians and universalists was the Southern Baptist Convention,” Lewis, a St. Louis pastor who went on to become president of the Home Mission Board (now the North American Mission Board), told Baptist Press. “… That bothered me a lot.”

Here’s why your state may be expanding religious freedom protections this year
Mark A. Kellner, Deseret News

The rush to enforce same-sex marriage across the country may trigger state legislative efforts to enact local versions of the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Supporters say cultural changes make this necessary; opponents fear boycotts.

Bible colleges sue for right to issue degrees
John O’Connor, Associated Press

Bible colleges in Illinois have filed a federal lawsuit against state education regulators, seeking the unencumbered right to award degrees to students who complete their programs.

Is Scholasticism Making a Comeback?
Rev. James V. Schall, S.J. , Crisis Magazine

In the September 1987 issue of Modern Age, Frederick Wilhelmsen wrote a famous essay titled: “Great Books: Enemies of Wisdom?” In it, he recounted his own experience as a student at the University of Detroit.



Mere Links 01.20.15
Tuesday, January 20, 2015, 10:00 AM

Niger protesters torched 45 churches – police
BBC

At least 10 people have been killed and 45 churches set on fire since protests erupted in Niger over the French magazine Charlie Hebdo’s depiction of the Prophet Muhammad, police say.

Proof The New York Times Only Censors Photos That Offend Violent Religious Sects
Mollie Hemingway, The Federalist

New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet has repeatedly claimed that the reason he’s not allowing any depictions of Muhammad to appear in the paper is because he’s highly attuned to religious sensibilities. It’s not because he’s terrified of Islamic radicals killing him or his staff. No really. That’s what he’s going with.

In Celebration Of Religious Liberty Day, ‘Je Suis American’
Kristina Arriaga, The Federalist

Religious liberty is often treated like the eccentric uncle of the human-rights family. It shouldn’t be. We need it now, perhaps, more than ever.

Illinois Abortion Clinics Inspected an Average of Once Every 9 Years
Evan Gahr, The Daily Signal

Forty percent of licensed clinics went between 14 and 17 years without inspections, according to the report. And only one of the federally funded Illinois Planned Parenthood clinics, which are not licensed, was ever inspected—in 1999.



Mere Links 01.16.15
Friday, January 16, 2015, 10:00 AM

9 Things You Should Know About Boko Haram
Joe Carter, The Gospel Coalition

What you should know about the the militant group waging a campaign of terror and attempting to establish an Islamic caliphate in Nigeria.

Pope: Fundamentalist terrorism result of ‘deviant religion’
Nicole Winfield, AP

Pope Francis on Monday denounced the religious fundamentalism that inspired the Paris massacres and ongoing Mideast conflicts, saying the attackers were enslaved by “deviant forms of religion” that used God as a mere ideological pretext to perpetuate mass killings.

Sunday morning still segregated, study shows
Bob Smietana, Baptist Press

Sunday morning remains one of the most segregated hours in American life, with more than 8 in 10 congregations made up of one predominant racial group, a LifeWay Research study shows.

Charlie Hebdo, Intolerance, and the Problem of Double Standards
Kim R. Holmes, Public Discourse

The terrible massacre in Paris could be a “teachable” moment on the meaning of tolerance, but it will require soul searching by America’s cultural leftists.



Mere Links 01.15.15
Thursday, January 15, 2015, 10:00 AM

How the Supreme Court Reacted to This Town Allowing Politicians Bigger Signs Than Churches
Hans von Spakovsky, The Daily Signal

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Reed v. Town of Gilbert, a challenge by a church to a town ordinance regulating signs.

In China, a church-state showdown of biblical proportions
Robert Marquand, Christian Science Monitor

Christianity is booming in China, propelling it toward becoming the world’s largest Christian nation. But as religion grows, it spurs a government crackdown.

A Little About Hebrews 12:2
Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon, Preachers Institute

After his long panegyric on the heroes of faith, the author of the Epistle makes reference to Jesus as “the leader and perfecter of faith” (12:2). This expression requires closer inspection, in order to understand Jesus’ relationship to faith.

Why ‘Ordinary Time’ is Most Extraordinary for God’s Work
Jim Tonkowich, Juicy Ecumenism

Christmas is over and as a friend likes to say, “Ain’t nothin’ as over as Christmas.”



Mere Links 01.14.15
Wednesday, January 14, 2015, 10:00 AM

Should We Leave Our Children Inheritances?
Randy Alcorn, Eternal Perspectives Ministries

“A good man leaves an inheritance for his children’s children” (Proverbs 13:22). As a result, many Christians defend and justify leaving vast sums of wealth to their children and grandchildren. I think in order to understand the principle behind this verse, we need to compare what an inheritance meant in biblical times, versus what an inheritance means in this culture today.

Supreme Court hears religious speech case
The Becket Fund

Arizona town’s ordinance allows signs for big politicians, but not small churches.

Does Religion Really Have a “Smart-People Problem”?
Fr. Robert Barron, Catholic World Report

Philosophy, so marked today by nihilism and postmodern relativism, is passing through a particularly corrupt period.

Maybe China Can’t Reverse Its Child Limit
The American Interest

The Chinese government is finding it harder to reverse the lasting effects of the one-child policy than it thought. Faced with the prospect of an aging population supported by too few young people, China decided in 2013 that it would allow couples to apply to have a second child.



Mere Links 01.13.15
Tuesday, January 13, 2015, 10:00 AM

Did He Stay or Did He Go?
Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon, Preachers Institute

It is instructive to compare and contrast the closing scenes of Jesus’ earthly presence as they are presented in Luke/Acts and Matthew.

The Mission Creep of Dignity
Mark Regnerus, Public Discourse

Dignity, rightly understood, has less to do with autonomy or independence than with intrinsic worth and the ability to flourish.

Religious Bias Issues Debated After Atlanta Mayor’s Dismissal of Fire Chief
Richard Fausset, New York Times

Mayor Kasim Reed’s decision to dismiss his fire chief last week for giving co-workers copies of a Christian self-help book condemning homosexuality is fanning new kinds of legal and political flames in this city, where deeply held religious convictions exist in a kind of defining tension with a reputation for New South tolerance.

Religious Liberty vs. Erotic Liberty — Religious Liberty is Losing
Albert Mohler

Barely five days after The New York Times ran a major news article on the firing of Atlanta’s fire chief for his views on homosexuality, a major Times opinion writer declared that religious liberty is a fine thing, so long as it is restricted to “pews, homes, and hearts” — far from public consequence.



Mere Links 01.12.15
Monday, January 12, 2015, 10:00 AM

Theological Extremism in a Secular Age
Albert Mohler

The war on terror took on a savage new face yesterday when two gunmen entered the headquarters of a French satirical newspaper known as Charlie Hebdo and opened fire, killing 12 people—10 people connected with the newspaper and two police officers.

House Republicans Introduce Late Term Abortion Ban
Philip Wegmann, The Daily Signal

With majorities in the House and Senate, Republicans have renewed their push to ban late-term abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

Did Vatican II Endorse Separation of Church and State?
Joseph G. Trabbic, Crisis Magazine

This year, 2015, marks fifty years since the close of the Second Vatican Council. Yet the “battle” for the Council, the battle for its authentic meaning, which began even before the bishops concluded their deliberations in 1965, continues still today.

Leelah’s Law Is Bad Law And Bad Medicine
Stella Morabito, The Federalist

A law named after a transgender teen who committed suicide would censor people and hurt children. Here’s why Leelah’s Law is a terrible idea.



Mere Links 01.09.15
Friday, January 9, 2015, 10:00 AM

Government Shouldn’t Force Religious Schools to Violate Religious Beliefs
Ryan T. Anderson, The Daily Signal

Just before the Christmas break, the D.C. City Council passed a law that could force pro-life organizations to pay for abortion coverage. But that wasn’t the only piece of bad legislation, violating religious liberty which came out of the D.C. Council in December.

Men Without Chests: How C.S. Lewis Predicted Charlie Hebdo Censorship
Sean Davis, The Federalist

History, theology, and even grammar must bow bow before the altar of terrorism.

Cardinal Raymond Burke: Catholic Church is too feminine
David Gibson, Religion News Service

A ‘feminized’ Church and altar girls caused the priest shortage, prelate says

Manila would like just about everyone to wear diapers for the pope’s visit next week
Adam Pasick, Quartz

A chronic shortage of portable toilets has prompted Francis Tolentino, chairman of the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority, to resort to extreme measures during Pope Francis’ visit to the Philippines next week: Recommending adult diapers for traffic police and many of the millions of people expected to attend an open-air mass in the heavily Catholic country.


Older Posts »